What I read in January 2019 (ENG)

(Polska wersja)

styczen — kopia

In 2019, I read 60 books, mainly e-books. It’s time to tell about them, this time in a different form than in the case of the literary summary of 2018. This time I want to write more about each book I read, so separate posts for each month of the last year will work better.

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Italy 2003 pt. 5 – First steps in Ravenna (ENG)

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(Other parts of the report from Italy: first, second, third, fourth.)

Next trip, this time to the north to Bellaria-Igea Marina, was to Ravenna, the capital of the following: Western Roman Empire in the years 402-476, the Kingdom of Ostrogoths, Ravenna Exarchate (Byzantine province on the Apennine Peninsula) in the years 540-751, and part of the Papal States in the years 765-1859. Ravenna was originally a seaside town, but as centuries passed, alluvial sediments would cut it off from the sea if it were not for the construction of an 11-kilometer long canal (the longest in Italy) at the beginning of the 18th century. Ravenna is a city with a stunning number of historic churches.

The first one we saw was the Basilica di Santa Maria in Porto. It is a minor basilica built in the 16th century.

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Source: own. Photo licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

The façade in its current form was built in 1784 by Camillo Morigia, to whom we owe the contemporary appearance of the Dante’s tomb and the clock tower – both of which we saw later.

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Italy 2003 pt. 2 – Rimini (ENG)

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(Other parts of the report from Italy: first, third, fourth, fifth.)

Rimini (formerly called Ariminum) is located just a few kilometers from Bellaria-Igea Marina. Despite the earthquake in 1672 and World War II bombings, many monuments from earlier eras are preserved there.

We started the tour from one of the two main markets of the city, Piazza Tre Martiri (Three Martyrs Square), named after three guerrilla men named Luigi Nicolò, Adelio Pagliarani and Mario Capelli, hanged by Nazi German occupiers on August 16, 1944. As you will soon see, this square was also a place of other dramatic events.

On the square there is the 16th-century Torre dell’Orologio (clock tower), with the eighteenth-century calendar with the signs of the Zodiac and the phases of the moon. On the lowest level there is a portico which middle, blind arch commemorates the inhabitants of Rimini who died during World War II. I saw similar monuments in various cities of Italy and France, which I think proves false the popular statement that national martyrdom is a unique Polish feature.

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Source: own. Photo licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

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